Swiss meringue (the art of fine baking~ paula
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Swiss meringue (the art of fine baking~ paula
  Swiss    Meringue    Cakes  
Last updated 6/12/2012 1:25:59 AM. Recipe ID 60182. Report a problem with this recipe.
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      Title: Swiss meringue (the art of fine baking~ paula
 Categories: Cakes
      Yield: 6 Servings
 
      5    Egg whites @ room temp
    1/4 ts Cream of tartar
    1/4 ts Salt
      1 ts Vanilla
  1 1/4 c  Sugar
 
  Grease & flour 2 baking sheets.  Combine egg whites, cream of tartar,
  salt, & vanilla in a large bowl. Beat (at medium speed if a mixer is
  used) until egg whites hold soft peaks. Gradually add 3/4 cup sugar,
  a tablespoon at a time, beating continuously. Continue beating until
  meringue is very stiff and dull. It has been beaten enough when a
  bit, rubbed between thumb & finger, is no longer grainy.  The
  meringue should be stiff enough to hold it's shape when formed with a
  pastry tube. Gently fold in remaining sugar.
  
  Meringues should actually be dried rather than baked. Herein lies the
  secret of making meringues which are tender, delicate, and
  light-colored, rather than overly crisp, tough, and too dark to be
  either attractive or delicious.  The best meringues are baked by the
  following method:
  
  Set oven teperature at 200 degrees before beginning to beat the egg
  whites. After shaping the meringue mixture on baking sheets, place in
  the preheated oven for 15 minutes. Then turn off the oven heat. Allow
  the meringues to remain in the oven with the heat rurned off for at
  least 4-5 hours -- the longer the better. If your oven has a pilot
  light, the meringues will be ready a little sooner.  The meringues
  should be totally dry before removing them from the oven.  If you
  can, leave them in the oven overnight.
  
  For many of us, however, time is a factor.  If you can't take the
  time to bake meringues this slow, slow way, accept second best &
  simply bake them slowly, setting the oven temperature for 200 degrees
  or less if possible. At 200 degrees, meringue layers will need to
  bake for about 40 minutes; small meringues may take a little less
  time.
  
  Whatever method you use, it is important to prevent the meringues from
  coloring, since even a light tan color changes their texture and
  taste as well as their appearance.
  
  When thoroughly dry, meringues can be kept covered in a dry airy
  place (NOT in a tightly covered box) for several weeks.
  
  ALTERNATE MIXING METHOD by ELECTRIC BEATER
  
  Combine egg whites, cream of tartar, salt, 1/2 cup sugar and vanilla
  in large bowl.  Beat at high speed until egg whites hold peaks. Add
  1/2 cup sugar, all at once. Beat at high speed until mixture is very
  stiff and there are no grains of undisolved sugar. Fold in remaining
  sugar.
  
  To shape Swiss Meringue into layers and rounds follow directions given
  below.
  
  Grease and flour a large baking sheet.  Press the rim of a 9-inch
  layer cake pan or a 2-inch cooky cutter lightly into the flour on
  baking sheet to make guides. If Baking Pan Liner Paper is used, the
  guiding circles will have to be traced with a pencil.  Spread mixture
  within circles. OR: Fill a pastry bag fitted with a No.3 or 5 tube
  with prepared mixture. Starting in center of each circle, press out
  bater in a long, continuous, pencil-thick strip, curling it round &
  round until traced circle is completely filled in (spiral).  For best
  control, press out batter slowly, holding bag at least 1 inch away
  from sheet.
  
  Bake in a 325 degree oven, 25 minutes for small rounds, 35-40 minutes
  for 9-inch layers.
 




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Recipe ID 60182 (Apr 03, 2005)

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