AOH :: P39-05.TXT

DIALOG Information Network


                                ==Phrack Inc.==

                  Volume Four, Issue Thirty-Nine, File 5 of 13

  ***************************************************************************
  *                                                                         *
  *                          The Complete Guide To                          *
  *                      The DIALOG Information Network                     *
  *                                                                         *
  *                                    by                                   *
  *                              Brian Oblivion                             *
  *                                                                         *
  * Courtesy of:       Restricted-Data-Transmissions (RDT)                  *
  *                  "Truth Is Cheap, But Information Costs."               *
  *                                                                         *
  *                                                                 5/9/92  *
  ***************************************************************************

INTRODUCTION:

     With the plethora of on-line databases in the public and private sectors,
I feel it is becoming increasingly important to penetrate and maintain access
to these databases.  The databases in question contain data pertaining to our
personal lives and to our environment, not to mention the tetrabytes of useful
information that can be directed toward research and personal education.


     Who or What is DIALOG?

     The DIALOG Information Network is a service that links various public and
commercial databases together for convenience.  In the past, when one wanted to
access LEGAL RESOURCE INDEX, for instance, one would have to dial direct.  With
DIALOG, hundreds of databases are connected via X.25 networks (Tymnet,
Sprintnet, Uninet, Dialnet) eliminating frustrating searching and outrageous
long distance telephone bills (before the AT&T divestiture).

     Further, within this file is a PARTIAL list of databases found on-line.
Some of the databases are nothing more than periodicals and abstract sources,
while others provide FullText articles and books.  There are over 2500
periodicals, newspapers, newsletters and newswires on-line in FullText.

Here are a few of my favorites:

McGraw-Hill Publications On-Line (File624)

     - Services offer FullText of their Newsletters serving the world-wide
aerospace and defense industry.  Complete text from 30 newsletters such as
AeroSpace Daily, BYTE, Aviation Week and Space Technology, Data Communications,
ENR, among others.  For more info on the database, when in DIALOG type Help
News624.

PR NEWSWIRE (File613)

     - PR Newswire records contain the complete text of news releases prepared
by:  companies; public relations agencies; trade associations; city, state,
federal and non-US Government agencies; and other sources covering the entire
spectrum of news.  The complete text of a news release typically contains
details or background information that is not published in newspapers.  More
than 8500 companies contribute news for PR Newswire.  PR NEWSWIRE is a known
agent of Corporate Intelligence.

DMS/FI MARKET INTELLIGENCE REPORTS (File589)

     - FullText of World AeroSpace Weekly, covers all aspects of both civil and
       military aerospace activities worldwide.
     - World Weapons Review, very high degree of technical detail and
       perspective.  As such, it has special appeal to military professionals
       and users of weapons.

Note:  The database treats the newsletters as separate Binders.  For example,
       to access the World Weapons Review, after connecting to the database,
       type:

              SELECT BN=WORLD WEAPONS REVIEW
              or whichever newsletter you wish to search.

FINE CHEMICALS DATABASE (File360)

     - The focus of this database is on sources for laboratory, specialty, and
unusual chemicals used in scientific research and new product development.
Fine chemicals are relatively pure chemicals typically produced in small
quantities.  The database will provide you with manufacturers and/or
distributors.

DUN'S ELECTRONIC YELLOW PAGES (File515)

     - Largest database of U.S. businesses available on DIALOG, providing
information on a total of 8.5 million establishments.  Corporate intelligence:
you can quickly verify the existence of a business.  Then you can obtain
address, telephone number, employee size, Standard Industrial Classification
(SIC) and other basic information.

CURRENT CONTENTS SEARCH (File440)

     - FullText articles from over 8000+ worldwide journals dealing with
science and technology.

BOOKS IN PRINT (File470)

     - Access to in-print and out-of-print books since 1979, BIP lets you
retrieve bibliographic data on virtually every book published or distributed in
the United States.  Plus FullText reviews on the book(s) you have selected.
See next.

PUBLISHERS DISTRIBUTORS AND WHOLESALERS ON-LINE (File450)

     - PDW on-line will locate virtually any book, audio cassette, software
publisher, distributor, or wholesaler in the U.S.

     You now should have an idea of the power and scope of the Dialog
Information Network.

NOTE:  Most of DIALOG's Services are now available to certain Research
       facilities, public and private, on CD-ROM.  Check your local public and
       university libraries for this service.  Of course, MANY of the more
       interesting databases are not available on CD-ROM and must still be
       accessed through the DIALOG network.


                           Access to DIALOG Services

     The following on-line services are available from DIALOG Information
Services:

              DIALOG
              DIALOG Business (DBC)
              DIALOG Medical Connection (DMC)
              DIALMAIL
              KNOWLEDGE INDEX

     The logon procedures for the first four are identical and use the same
service address; procedures for KNOWLEDGE INDEX differ only in the use of the
KI service address, as illustrated throughout this file.

     The most common method of access to DIALOG services uses local phone
numbers for three telecommunication networks: DIALOG's DIALNET, BT Tymnet,
TYMNET, and SprintNet.  For those who live in an area that lacks a local dialup
for those three networks, you may use the 800 link into the DIALNET for access
to all DIALOG services except KNOWLEDGE INDEX.  This access is not free, but it
may cost less than dialing long-distance to reach a network node if you live in
a region without local access.  Access is also available through gateways from
other on-line systems.

     Access to many DIALOG services is available from countries throughout the
world and may be accessed from their own Public Data Networks.

Dialnet 800-Number Access

The two DIALNET 800 numbers are available for connecting to Dialog services
from anywhere in the 48 contiguous states.  Access through these numbers is not
free.

     (800)DIALNET     300, 1200, and 2400 b. (w/MNP error checking)
     (800)342-5638

     (800)847-1620    VADIC 3400 series modems (1200 baud)
                      BELL 103 modems (300 baud)
                      BELL 212 modems (1200 baud)

Note:  I have excluded all the dialup numbers for Tymnet and Sprintnet.  If you
       don't know how to find those, obtain a file on X.25 nets and I'm sure
       they will be listed somewhere in them.


                          DIALNET U.S. DIALUP NUMBERS

     (All DIALNET dialup numbers support 300, 1200, and 2400 baud)

     ARIZONA
     Phoenix....................................(602)257-8895

     CALIFORNIA
     Alhambra...................................(818)300-9000
     Longbeach..................................(213)491-0803
     Los Angeles................................(818)300-9000
     Marina Del Rey.............................(213)305-9833
     Newport Beach..............................(714)756-1969
     Oakland....................................(415)633-7900
     Palo Alto..................................(415)858-2461
     Palo Alto..................................(415)858-2461
     Palo Alto....................................(415)858-2575
     Sacramento.................................(916)444-5030
     San Diego..................................(619)297-8610
     San Francisco..............................(415)957-5910
     San Jose...................................(408)432-0590

     COLORADO
     Denver.....................................(303)860-9800

     CONNECTICUT
     Bloomfield/Hartford........................(203)242-5954
     Stamford...................................(203)324-1201

     DELAWARE
     Wilmington.................................(302)652-1706

     DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
     Washington.................................(703)359-2500

     GEORGIA
     Atlanta....................................(404)455-4221

     ILLINOIS
     Chicago....................................(312)341-1444

     INDIANA
     Indianapolis...............................(317)635-7259

     MARYLAND
     Baltimore..................................(301)234-0940

     MASSACHUSETTS
     Boston.....................................(617)439-7920
     Lexington..................................(617)862-6240

     MICHIGAN
     Ann Arbor..................................(313)973-2622
     Detroit....................................(313)964-1309

     MINNESOTA
     Minneapolis................................(612)338-0676

     MISSOURI
     St. Louis..................................(314)731-0122

     NEW JERSEY
     Lyndhurst..................................(201)460-8868
     Morristown.................................(201)292-9646
     Newark.....................................(201)824-1412
     Piscataway.................................(201)562-9680
     Princeton..................................(609)243-9550

     NEW MEXICO
     Albuquerque................................(505)764-9281

     NEW YORK
     Albany.....................................(518)458-8710
     Buffalo....................................(716)896-9440
     Hempstead..................................(516)489-6868
     New York City..............................(212)422-0410
     Rochester..................................(716)458-7300
     White Plains...............................(914)328-7810

     NORTH CAROLINA
     Research Triangle..........................(919)549-9290

     OHIO
     Cincinnati.................................(513)489-3980
     Cleveland..................................(216)621-3807
     Columbus...................................(614)461-8348
     Dayton.....................................(513)898-8878

     OREGON
     Portland...................................(503)228-2771

     PENNSYLVANIA
     Allentown..................................(215)776-2030
     Philadelphia...............................(215)923-5214
     Pittsburg..................................(412)471-1421
     Valley Forge/Norristown....................(215)666-1500

     TEXAS
     Austin.....................................(512)462-9494
     Dallas.....................................(214)631-9861
     Houston....................................(713)531-0505

     UTAH
     Salt Lake City.............................(801)532-3071

     VIRGINIA
     Fairfax....................................(703)359-2500

     WASHINGTON
     Seattle....................................(206)282-5009

     WISCONSIN
     Milwaukee..................................(414)796-1785


                       Access to Dialog Outside of the US

     Foreign readers may access Dialog via the INFONET PDN.  The following
numbers are for those particular users.

     BELGIUM
     Brussels (300).............................(02)648-0710
     Brussels (1200)............................(02)640-4993

     DENMARK
     Copenhagen (300)...........................(01)22-10-66
     Copenhagen (1200)..........................(01)22-41-22
                  Logging in to DIALOG or KNOWLEDGE INDEX (KI)

     After dialing the appropriate number and establishing the connection, you
must allow a 10-second delay and then enter the letter A (or a carriage return
or another terminal identifier from the table below) before any further
response will occur.  Then, follow the remainder of the procedures show below.

DIALOG Information Services' DIALNET
-2151:01-012-
Enter Service: dialog                     Enter DIALOG or KI;

DIALNET: call connected
DIALOG INFORMATION SERVICES
PLEASE LOGON:
?XXXXXXXX                                 Enter User Number

ENTER PASSWORD:
?XXXXXXXX                                 Enter Password;


NOTE:  I have researched the method of user number and password distribution
       and all user numbers and passwords are generated by Dialog, BUT upon
       receiving a password from DIALOG you may opt to change it.  The
       passwords issued from DIALOG are 8 digits long, consisting of random
       alpha-numeric characters.

Once you are connected to your default service or file in DIALOG, you can then
BEGIN one of the other services; for example, to access DIALMAIL, BEGIN MAIL.

                  DIALNET Terminal Identifiers

      Speed       Identifier       Terminal Type      Effect
 =---------------------------------------------------------------=
     300 bps      ENTER key       PCs & CRTs       Same as A
                      E          Thermal Printers   Slower
                      C          Impact Printers     Slowest
                      G          Belt Printer        Slower

    1200 bps      ENTER key       PCs & CRTs       Same as A
       or             G          Matrix Printers     Slower
    2400 bps          I          Belt Printers       Slowest

- For access in half duplex, enter a < CTRL H > after the "Enter Service:"
  prompt and before entering the word "dialog" or "ki."

- Don't hit backspace if you make an error in typing "dialog" or "ki."  The
  result will be toggling your duplex, reason being your backspace is usually
  configured to send a < CTRL H > to delete to the left of the cursor one
  space.

                                DIALNET Messages

  Message                  Probable Cause       User Action

  ERROR, RE-ENTER SERVICE  Incorrect host name  Check typing

  ALL PORTS BUSY           All DIALOG ports     Try in a few min.
                           are temporarily in
                           use.

  HOST DOWN                DIALOG computer is   Try in a few min.
                           not available.

  HOST NOT RESPONDING      DIALOG Computer      Try in a few min.
                           difficulty

  CIRCUITS BUSY            DIALNET Network is   Try in a few min.
                           temporarily busy.

  DIALNET: CALL CLEARED    Appears after LOGOFF
    BY REQUEST             to indicate connection
  ENTER SERVICE:           to DIALOG is broken.

  DROPPED BY HOST SYSTEM   Indicates a system failure
                           at DIALOG.


                              Navigating in DIALOG


 To begin a search, one would enter:

              BEGIN xxxx

xxxx would be the database file number.  All databases found on DIALOG are
assigned file numbers.  The searching protocol used to manipulate DIALOG seems
at times to be a language in itself, but it can be easily learned and mastered.


                                DIALOG HOMEBASE

     I would advise the first-timer to jump into the DIALOG Homebase Menu,
which provides information, help, file of the month, database info and rates,
the DIALINDEX, DIALOG Training, and announcements.  DIALOG also provides
subscribers with special services which include dialouts for certain area
codes.  You can begin the DIALOG HOMBASE by typing:

              BEGIN HOME

=-**************************************************************-=


                       DIALOG DATABASES

 File Number  Database
     15       ABI/INFORM
    180       Academic American Encyclopedia
     43       ADTRACT
    108       Aerospace Database
 10,110       AGRICOLA
      9       AIM/ARM
     38       America:History & Life
    236       American Men & Women of Science
258,259       AP NEWS
     45       APTIC
    112       Aquaculture
    116       Aqualine
     44       Aquatic Science & Fisheries ABS
     56       Art Bibliographies, Modern
    192       Arthur D. Little On-Line
    102       ASI
    285       BIOBUSINESS
287,288       Biography Master Index
  5, 55
    255       BIOSIS Previews
    175       BLS Consumer Price Index
    178       BLS Employment, Hours, and Earnings
    176       BLS Producer Price Index
    137       Book Review Index
    470       Books In Print
    256       Business Software Database
308-311
    320       CA Search
     50       CAB Abstracts
    262       Canadian Business and Current Affairs
    162       Career Placement Registry/ Experienced Personnel
    163       Career Placement Reg/Student
    580       CENDATA
    138       Chemical Exposure
     19       Chemical Industry Notes
    174       Chem Regulations & Guidelines
300,301       CHEMNAME, CHEMSIS
328-331       CHEMZERO
     30       CHEMSEARCH
     64       Chile Abuse & Neglect
    410       Chronolog Newsletter-International Edition
    101       Compuserve Information Service
220-222       CLAIMS Citation
    124       CLAIMS Class
    242       CLAIMS Compound Registry
23-25,125
223-225       CLAIMS US Patents
    123       CLAIMS Reassignment & Re-examination
    219       Clinical Abstracts
    164       Coffeeline
194-195       Commerce Business Daily
    593       Compare Products
      8       Compendex
    275       The Computer Database
     77       Conference Papers Index
    135       Congressional Record Abstracts
    271       Consumer Drug Info Fulltext
    171       Criminal Justice Period Index
     60       CRIS/USDA
    230       DATABASE OF DATABASES
    516       D&B - Dun's Market Identifiers
    517       D&B - Million Dollar Directory
    518       D&B - International Dun's Market Identifiers
    411       DIALINDEX
    200       DIALOG PUBLICATIONS
    100       Disclosure II
    540       Disclosure Spectrum Ownership
     35       Dissertation Abstracts On-Line
103,104       DOE Energy
    575       Donnelley Demographics
    229       Drug Information Fulltext
    139       Economic Literature Index
    165       Ei Engineering Meetings
    241       Electric Power Database
    511       Electronic Dictionary of Education
    507       Construction Directory
    501       Financial Services Directory
    510       Manufactures Directory
    502       Professionals Directory
504-506       Retailers Directory
508,509       Services Directory
    503       Wholesalers Directory
    500       Electronic Yellow Pages Index
 72, 73       EMBASE (Excerpta Medica)
172,173       EMBASE
    114       Encyclopedia of Associations
     69       Energyline
    169       Energynet
     40       ENVIROLINE
     68       Environmental Bibliography
      1       eric
     54       Exceptional Child Education Resources
    291       Family Resources
     20       Federal Index
    136       Federal Register Abstracts
    265       Federal Research in Progress
    196       Find/SVP Reports and studies Index
    268       FINIS: Financial Industry Information Service
     96       Fluidex
     51       Food Science & Technology Abstracts
     79       Foods Adlibra
     90       Foreign Trade & Econ Abstracts
    105       Foreign Traders Index
     26       Foundation Directory
     27       Foundation Grants Index
     58       Geoarchive
     89       Georef
     66       GPO Monthly Catalog
    166       GPO Publications Reference File
     85       Grants
    122       Harvard Business Review
    151       Health Planning And Administration
     39       Historical Abstracts
    561       ICC British Company Directory
    562       ICC British Financial Datasheets
    189       Industry Data Sources
    202       Information Science Abstracts
 12, 13       INSPEC
    168       Insurance Abstracts
    209       International Listing Service
     74       International Pharmaceutical Abstracts
    545       Investext
    284       IRS TAXiNFO
     14       ISMEC
    244       LABORLAW
     36       Language & Language Behavior Abstracts
426-427       LC MARC
    150       Legal Resource Index
     76       Life Sciences Collection
     61       LISA
    647       Magazine ASAP
     47       Magazine Index
     75       Management Contents
    234       Marquis Who's Who
    235       Marquis Pro-files
    239       Mathfile
    546       Media General Database
152-154       MEDLINE
     86       Mental Health Abstracts
    232       Menu The International Software Database
     32       METADEX
     29       Meteor/Geoastrophysical Abstracts
    233       Microcomputer Index
     32       MERADEX
     29       Meteor/Geoastrophysical Abstracts
    233       Microcomputer Index
    248       The Middle East: Abstracts and Index
    249       Mideast File
     71       MLA Bibliography
    555       Moody's Corporate Profiles
    557       Moody's Corporate News-International
    556       Moody's Corporate News - U.S.
     78       National Foundations
    111       National Newspaper News - U.S.
     21       NCJRS
    211       Newsearch
     46       NICEM
     70       NICSEM/NIMIS
    118       Nonferrous Metals Abstracts
      6       NTIS
    218       Nursing & Allied Health
    161       Occupational Safety and Health
     28       Oceanic Abstracts
    170       ON-LINE Chronicle
    215       ONTAP ABI/INFORM
    205       ONTAP BIOSIS Previews
    204       ONTAP CA SEARCH
    250       ONTAP CAB Abstracts
    231       ONTAP Chemname
    208       ONTAP Compendex
    290       ONTAP DIALINDEX
    201       ONTAP ERIC
    272       ONTAP Embase
    213       ONTAP Inspec
    247       ONTAP Magazine Index
    254       ONTAP Medline
    216       ONTAP PTS Promt
    294       ONTAP Scisearch
    207       ONTAP Social Scisearch
    296       ONTAP Trademarkscan
    280       ONTAP World Patents Index
     49       PAIS International
    240       Paperchem
    243       PATLAW
    257       P/E News
    241       Peterson's College Database
     42       Pharmaceutical News Index
     57       Philosopher's Index
     41       Pollution Abstracts
     91       Population Bibliography
    140       PsycALERT
     11       PsycINFO
     17       PTS Annual Reports Abstracts
     80       PTS Defense Markets and Technology
     18       PTS F&S Indexes 80-
     98       PTS F&S Indexes 72-79
 81, 83       PTS Forecasts
    570       PTS MARS
     16       PTS PROMPT
 82, 84       PTS TIME SERIES
    190       Religion Index
421-425       TEMARC
     97       Rilm Abstracts
 34, 87       SciSearch
94, 186       SciSearch
      7       Social Scisearch
    270       Soviet Science and Technology
     37       Sociological Abstracts
     62       SPIN
     65       SSIE Current Research
    132       Standard & Poor's News
    133       Standard & Poor's Corporate Descriptions
    526       Standard & Poor's Register-Biographical
    527       Standard & Poor's Register-Corporate
    113       Standards & Specifications
    238       Telgen
    119       Textile Technology Digest
    535       Thomas Tegister On-Line
    648       Trade & Industry ASAP
    148       Trade & Industry Index
106,107       Trade Opportunities
    226       Trademarkscan
    531       Trinet Establishment Database
    532       Trinet Company Database
     63       TRIS
     52       TSCA Initial Inventory
    480       Ulrich's International Periodicals Directory
260,261       UPI NEWS
    126       U.S. Exports
     93       U.S. Political Science Documents
    120       U.S. Public School Directory
    184       Washington Post Index
    117       Water Resources Abstracts
350,351       World Patents Index
     67       World Textiles
    185       Zoological Record


     Before I continue describing the various methods of searching, DIALOG has
an on-line master index to the DIALOG databases, DIALINDEX (file 411).  It is a
collection of the file indexes of most DIALOG databases (menu-driven databases
cannot be searched in DIALINDEX).  DIALINDEX can be used to determine the
number of relevant records for a single query in a collection of files.  The
query can be a single term, a multiple-word phrase, a prefix-coded field, or a
full logical expression of up to 240 characters.  Nested terminology, proximity
operators, and truncated terms may also be used.

     You can set the files you want searched by using the SET FILE command.
Like this:

              BEGIN 411 (return)

              SET FILE ALLNEWS (if you want the latest news on
                    or          hack/phreak busts)
              SF ALLNEWS

  To scan all Subjects:  SET FILES ALL

  To scan specific categories:
                   All Science:   (ALLSCIENCE)
                                  - Agriculture & Nutrition
                                  - Chemistry
                                  - Computer Technology
                                  - Energy & Environment
                                  - Medicine & Biosciences
                                  - Patents & Trademarks
                                  - Science & technology
                   All Business:  (ALLBUSINESS)
                                  - Business Information
                                  - Company Information
                                  - Industry Analysis
                                  - News
                                  - Patents & Trademarks
    All News and Current Events:  (ALLNEWS)
                                  - News
           All Law & Government:  (ALLLAW;ALLGOVERNMENT)
                                  - Law & Government
                                  - Patents & Trademarks
All Social Science & Humanities:  (ALLSOCIAL;ALLHUMANITIES)
                                  - Social Sciences & Humanities
           All General Interest:  (ALLGENERAL)
                                  - Popular Information
                  All Reference:  (ALLREFERENCE)
                                  - Books
                                  - Reference
                       All Text:  (ALLTEXT)
                                  All databases containing
                                  complete text of:
                                  - Journal Articles
                                  - Encyclopedias
                                  - Newspapers
                                  - Newswires
                    All Sources:  (ALLSOURCE)
                                  - Complete Text
                                  - Directory
                                  - Numeric Data
       All ONTAP Training Files:  (ALLONTAPS)
                                  - All On-Line Training And
                                    Practice databases


     Once you have selected a database you can now SELECT the search keyword.
You set the flag by:

SELECT term       -  Retrieves a set of records containing the term.
                     May be used with words, prefix or suffix codes, EXPAND, or
                     set numbers.

     When defining what you are searching for you can use logical operators
such as:

     OR - puts the retrieval of all search terms into one set, eliminating
          duplicate records.

    AND - retrieves the intersection, or overlap, of the search terms:  all
          terms must be in each record retrieved.

    NOT - eliminates search term (or group of search terms) following it from
          other search term(s).

     Note:  Always enter a space on either side of a logical operator.

     SELECT Examples:

     SELECT (BICMOS OR CMOS) AND SRAM
                 or
     S (BICMOS OR CMOS) AND SRAM

- This would generate something like this:
              138 BICMOS <- records containing BICMOS only
             1378 CMOS   <- records containing CMOS only
              681 SRAM   <- records containing SRAM only
       S1     203 (BICMOS OR CMOS) AND SRAM  <- this is what you
       ^^                                       wanted.
       || DIALOG names your select topic S1, S2... respectively as search its
          databases to make it easier to type.  The contents of S1 are 203
          found records containing the keywords BICMOS, CMOS, and SRAM.
          Sometimes S1 is referred to as S(tep) 1

PROXIMITY OPERATORS (Select command)

 (W) Requests terms be adjacent to each other and in order
     specified.                   -> S SOLAR(W)ENERGY
(nW) Requests terms be within (n) words of each other and in order
     specified.                   -> S SOLAR(3W)ENERGY
 (N) Requests terms be adjacent but in any order.  Useful for
     retrieving identical terms.  -> S SOLAR(N)ENERGY
(nN) Requests terms be within (n) words of each other and in any
     order.                       -> S SOLAR(3N)ENERGY
 (F) Requests terms be in same field of same record, in any order.
                                  -> S SOLAR(F)ENERGY
 (L) Requests terms be in same descriptor unit as defined by
     database.                    -> S SOLAR(L)ENERGY
 (S) Requests terms be in same Subfield unit as defined by
     database.                    -> S SOLAR(S)ENERGY
 (C) Equivalent to logic operator AND.
                                  -> S SOLAR(C)ENERGY

PRIORITY OF EXECUTION

              Proximity operator, NOT, AND, OR

 Use parentheses to specify different order of execution, e.g. SELECT (SOLAR OR
 SUN) AND (ENERGY OR HEAT).  Terms within parentheses are executed first.

STOP WORDS (predefined)

The following words may not be SELECTed as individual terms.  The computer will
retrieve a set with zero results.  They may only be replaced with proximity
operators, e.g. S GONE(2W)WIND

                   AN       FOR       THE
                   AND      FROM      TO
                   BY       OF        WITH

RESERVED WORDS AND SYMBOLS

The following words and symbols must be enclosed in quotation marks whenever
they are SELECTed as or within search terms, e.g., SELECT "OR"(W)GATE?

              AND         =
              FROM        *
              NOT         +
              OR          :
              STEPS       /

TRUNCATION

OPEN:  any number of characters following stem.
                                                      SS EMPLOY?
RESTRICTED:  only one additional character following stem.
                                                      SS HORSE? ?
RESTRICTED:  maximum number of additional characters equal to
             number of question marks entered.        SS UNIVERS??

INTERNAL:  allows character replaced by question mark to vary. One
           character per question mark.               SS WOM?N


BASIC INDEX FIELD SPECIFICATION (SUFFIX CODES)

Suffix codes are used to restrict retrieval to specified basic index fields of
a record.  Specific fields and codes vary according to the database.

     Abstract                            /AB
     Descriptor                          /DE
     Full Descriptor(single word)        /DF
     Identifier                          /ID
     Full Identifier(single word)        /IF
     Title                               /TI
     Note                                /NT
     Section Heading                     /SH

Examples:

     SELECT BUDGET?/TI
     SELECT POP(W)TOP(W)CAN?/TI,AB
     SELECT (DOLPHIN? OR PORPOISE?)/DE/ID


ADDITIONAL INDEXES (PREFIX CODES)

Prefix codes are used to search additional indexes.  Specific fields and codes
vary according to the database.

     Author                       AU=
     Company Name                 CO=
     Corporate Source             CS=
     Document Type                DT=
     Journal Name                 JN=
     Language                     LA=
     Publication Year             PY=
     Update                       UD=

Examples:

     SELECT AU=JOHNSON, ROBERT?
     SELECT LA=GERMAN
     SELECT CS=(MILAN(F)ITALY)


RANGE SEARCHING

A colon is used to indicate a range of sequential entries to be retrieved in a
logical OR relationship.

Examples:

     SELECT CC=64072:64078
     SELECT ZP=662521:62526


LIMIT QUALIFIERS

Limit qualifiers are used in SELECT statements to limit search terms or sets to
given criteria.  Specific qualifiers vary according to database.

     English language documents   /ENG
     Major descriptor             /MAJ
     Patents                      /PAT
     Human subject                /HUM
     Accession number range       /nnnnnn-nnnnnn

Examples:

     SELECT TRANSISTORS/ENG,PAT
     SELECT S2/MAJ
     SELECT (STRESS OR TENSION)/234567-999999

     Well that's it for basic searching.  Now, how to view the record you have
selected.

     Note:  Indexes (prefix codes) often differ from database to
database, often resulting in futile searches.  One way to avoid this
is to make a trip to the local Public or University Library and look
up the blue sheets for the database you wish to query.  Blue sheets
are issued by dialog as a service to their users.  Blue Sheets often
contain helpful searching techniques ere to the database you are
interested in.  They will also contain a list of Indexes (prefix
codes) unique to that database only.


                             VIEWING SEARCH RESULTS


COMMAND SUMMARY

TYPE            Provides continuous on-line display of results.
T               Specify set/format/range of items.  If Item range is specified,
                use T to view next record.  May also be used with specific
                accession number.

 Examples:    T 12/3/1-22    <- set/format/range
              T 8/7          <- set/format
              T 6            <- view next.(6 in this case)
              T 438721       <- view record 438721


DISPLAY         Provides display of results one screen at a time.  Use
D               PAGE for subsequent screens.
                Specify set/format/range of items.  If range not specified, use
                D to view next record.  May also be used with specific
                accession number.

 Examples:    D 11/6/1-44     <- set/format/range
              D 9/5           <- set/format
              D 7             <- view next.(7 in this case)
              D 637372/7      <- view record 637372/format 7


PRINT            Requests that results be printed offline and mailed.  Specify
                 set/format/range of items.  If item range not specified up to
                 50 records will be printed.  Use PR to print another 50.

 Examples:    PR 9/5/1-44      <- print set/format/range
              PR 6/7           <- print set/format (all)
              PR 14            <- print 14 only
              PR 734443/5      <- print 734443 format 5 only.


PRINT TITLE xxx  To specify a title(xxx) to appear on PRINTs.  Title may
                 contain up to 70 characters.  No semicolon may be used.  Must
                 be entered in database before any other PRINT command is used.
                 Cancelled by next BEGIN.

Examples:     PR TITLE GLOBULIN
              PR TITLE QUETZAL


REPORT           Extracts data from specified fields and produces tabular
                 format for on-line output only.  Specify set/range of
                 items/fields.  May be used with SORTED set to specify order of
                 entries in table.  Application is database-specific.


TYPICAL FORMATS IN BIBLIOGRAPHIC FILES:

 Format Number   Description
      1          DIALOG Accession Number
      2          Full Record except Abstract
      3          Bibliographic Citation
      5          Full Record
      6          Title
      7          Bibliographic Citation and Abstract
      8          Title and Indexing

NOTE: Again, the Formats differ from database to database.
      See database bluesheet for specific format descriptions.


OTHER OUTPUT-RELATED COMMANDS:

PRINT CANCEL        Used alone, cancels preceding PRINT command.
PR CANCEL           Specify PRINT Transaction Number to cancel
PRINT-              any PRINT request entered in past two hours,
PR-                 e.g. PRINT- P143

PRINT QUERY         To view log of PRINT commands and cancellations.  Add
PR QUERY            DETAIL to see date, time and costs.

PRINT QUERY ACTIVE  To view log of PRINT commands that may still be cancelled.
PR QUERY ACTIVE     Add DETAIL to see date, time, file and costs.

SORT                Sorts set of records on-line according to parameters
                    indicated. Varies per database.  Specify set
                    number/range/field,sequence, e.g. SORT 4/1-55/AU,TI
                    Sequence assumed ascending if not specified; use D to
                    specify descending order.  SORT parameters may be added to
                    end of PRINT command for offline sorting, e.g. PRINT
                    9/5/ALL/SD,D

SET SCREEN nn nn    Sets size of screen for video display.
SET H nn            H (horizontal) given first in combined command.
SET V nn            V Default is 75 characters H, 40 lines V


LOGOFF              Disconnects user from DIALOG system.
LOGOFF HOLD         Disconnects user from DIALOG system, holds work for 10
                    minutes allowing RECONNECT.


OTHER COMMANDS:

DISPLAY SETS        Lists all sets formed since last BEGIN command.
DS                  May specify range of sets, e.g. DS 10-22.

EXPLAIN             Requests help messages for commands and file features.
                    Enter ?EXPLAIN to see complete list.

KEEP                Places records indicated in special set 0.  Specify
K                   set number/records, or accession number.  Cancelled by a
                    BEGIN command.  Also used in DIALORDER.

LIMITALL            Limits all subsequent sets to criteria specified.  Varies
                    per database.

LIMITALL/ALL        Cancels previous LIMITALL command.

?LIMIT n            Requests list of limit qualifiers for database n.


SEARCH*SAVE


SAVE                Stores strategy permanently until deleted.  Serial number
                    begins with S.

SAVE TEMP           Stores strategy for seven days; automatically deleted.
                    Serial number begins with T.

SAVE SDI            Stores strategy and PRINT command(s) until deleted.  PRINT
                    command required.  Automatically executes strategy against
                    each new update to database in which entered.  Serial
                    number begins with D.

MAPxx               Creates a Search*Save of data extracted for field xx of
MAPxx TEMP          records already retrieved.

MAPxx STEPS         If STEPS is used, data is formatted into separate search
                    statements in Search*Save.


REVIEWING SEARCH*SAVES


RECALL nnnnn        Recalls Search*Save nnnnn, displaying all set-producing
                    commands and comment lines, without executing the search.

RECALL SAVE         Displays serial numbers of all permanent SAVEs, date
                    entered, and number of lines.

RECALL TEMP         Displays serial numbers of all temporary SAVEs, date
                    entered, and number of lines.

RECALL SDI          Displays serial numbers of all SDIs, dates entered,
                    databases in which stored, and number of lines.


EXECUTING SEARCH*SAVES


EXECUTE nnnnn       Executes entire strategy.  Only last line is assigned a
EX nnnnn            set number.

EXECUTE STEPS nnnnn Executes entire strategy.  Assigns set number to each
EXS nnnnn           search element.  Preferred form.

EXECUTE nnnnn/x-y   Executes strategy nnnnn form command line x to command line
                    y only.  STEPS may also be used:   EXS nnnnn/x-y

EXECUTE nnnnn/USER a

                    Executes strategy nnnnn originally entered by
                    user a (a=user number).
                    STEPS may also be used: EXS nnnnn/USER a

EXECUTE nnnnn/x-y/USER a

                    Executes strategy nnnnn from command line x to command line
                    y, originally entered by user a.  STEPS may also be used:
                    EXS nnnnn/x-y/USER a


DELETING SEARCH*SAVES


RELEASE nnnnn       Deletes search nnnnn from system.


OTHER SEARCH*SAVE OPTIONS


NAMING:  A three to five alphanumerical name may be specified following the
         SAVE, SAVE TEMP, and SAVE SDI commands.
         Example:  SAVE TEMP SOLAR

COMMENTS:  An informative comment may be stored in a SEARCH*SAVE by entering an
           asterisk in place of a command, followed by up to 240 characters of
           "comment."  The line will be saved with any SEARCH*SAVE command, and
           will display in RECALL of the search.

           Example: * Search for R.J.Flappjack


ON-LINE TEXT EDITOR


Any Search*Save, with the exception of an SDI, may be edited from within any
database.  An SDI must be edited within the database in which the SDI is to be
stored.

EDIT          To enter Editor and create new text.
EDIT xxxxx    Pulls Search*Save xxxxx into Editor for editing.

LIST          Displays text to be edited.
L             OPTIONS:
                LIST              LIST 30-110
                LIST ALL          LIST 10,50,80
LIST /data/   Locates all lines containing data.

INSERT        Adds onto end of text.
INSERT nn     Inserts line nn into text.
I             To return to EDIT from INSERT, enter a period on a
I nn          blank line.
DELETE        To delete line(s) of text.
D             OPTIONS:
                DELETE 10-50
                DELETE 10,30-50
                DELETE ALL

CHANGE        To change text within a line.
C             Changes only first occurrence of old text in any given line.
              OPTIONS:
                CHANGE 60/old/new (where 60 is line number)
                CHANGE 60/old//   (deletes old)
                C 60//new         (inserts new at beginning of line)
                C 80.old.new      (when text contains slash)
                C /old/new        (new replaces old on all lines)
                C 20,40/old/new   (nonsequential lines)
                C 30-50/old/new   (range of lines)

COPY          Duplicates line# TO line#
CO            OPTIONS:
                COPY 100 to 255
                COPY 100-150 TO 255
                COPY 100,130 TO 255

MOVE          Move line# TO line#
M             Options same as COPY.

QUERY         Produces message giving name of file, number of lines, last line
Q             number.

RENUM         Renumbers lines by tens unless otherwise specified.
R             OPTIONS:
                RENUM n           (Renumbers by increments of n)

QUIT          Used to leave editor ignoring session.

SAVE          Used to create Search*Save strategy from edited file.
SAVE TEMP     An SDI must include a PRINT command.
SAVE SDI


     Enjoy the DIALOG Information Network.  I've found it most interesting.
This service is a MUST if you are in college or if you just love to learn as
uch as time permits.  It is a proven research tool used by R&D and university
facilities around the world, as well as a refined corporate intelligence
information gathering tool kept hidden from the general public by sheer expense
and "pseudo-complexity."  With on-line databases like DIALOG available, there
is no excuse (besides lack of time) for self-education.

       *****************************************************************

Brian Oblivion can be reached at Oblivion@ATDT.ORG.

Additionally, he can be reached at Black Crawling Systems/VOiD Information
Archives (for more information, e-mail Brian).  RDT welcomes any questions or
comments you may have.  See you at SummerCon '92.
_______________________________________________________________________________


AOH Site layout & design copyright © 2006 AOH