Visit our newest sister site!
Hundreds of free aircraft flight manuals
Civilian • Historical • Military • Declassified • FREE!


TUCoPS :: Phreaking Cellular - Misc. :: definit.txt

Cellular Acronym Definitions




                               DEFINITIONS
                               -----------

NOTE:  Most manufacturers use a "1" to enable and a "0" to disable options,
       there are some exceptions and these are noted within the specific
       phone's file.


ACCOLC   ACCESS OVERLOAD CLASS

A two digit field used by the Cellular carriers to determine who has
priority access in the event of an emergency.  This has not been widely
implemented and the suggested entry is 0 and the last digit of the
telephone number for general subscribers.


EE       END TO END

A single digit (1 bit) entry that determines whether DTMF tones ("Touch
Tones") are transmitted over the voice channel to allow access to remote
services.  Set to "1" under normal circumstances.


GIM      GROUP IDENTIFICATION

A two digit/four bit field that determines how much of the SIDH is used to
identify when the mobile is roaming.  This number is normally 10 in the USA.


HA       HORN ALERT

A single digit (1 bit) entry that enables the horn alert on mobile phones.
When enabled ("1") most mobiles will send a ground pulse to the horn alert
connector (usually a wire in the power cable) during the first few rings.
This is designed to honk the horn or flash the lights, a relay must be
used to avoid damage to the phone as the output pulse is low current.


HF       HANDS FREE

A single digit (1 bit) entry that enables the hands free feature on phones
so equipped.


IPCH     INITIAL PAGING CHANNEL

A three digit number indicating the initial paging channel, normally set
to 333 for non-wireline (A) and 334 for wireline (B) systems.  A leading
zero is common in this field.


LU       LOCAL USE MARK

A single digit (1 bit) field that determines whether the phone transmits
registration information as soon as it powers up, usually set to "1".


MIN      MOBILE IDENTIFICATION NUMBER

This is in fact two entries, MIN1 and MIN2.  MIN2 is the three digit area
code and MIN1 is the seven digit phone number.  On most newer phones this is
entered as one ten digit number and is rarely referred to as MIN1 and MIN2.


MM       MIN MARK

A single digit (1 bit) entry that determines whether the phone transmits the
area code when accessing the system, usually set to "1".


PS       PREFERRED SYSTEM

A single digit (1 bit) entry that determines whether the mobile scans
channels 1 through 333 for the "A" system, or channels 334 through 666 for
the "B" system.  Set to "0" for A, and "1" for B system.  This entry should
match the last digit of the SIDH (see below).


REP      REPERTORY

A single digit (1 bit) entry that enables repertory memory (speed dialing),
normally set to "1".


RM       RADIO MUTE

A single digit (1 bit) entry that enables the radio mute feature on mobiles
so equipped.  Generally only available when the horn alert feature is
disabled as the radio mute often uses the same wire as the horn alert.
When enabled the radio mute wire/connector will go to ground when the phone
is in use.  Use this ground to turn off or mute the car stereo, as with horn
alert use a relay.


SCM      STATION CLASS MARK

A 4 bit binary, 2 digit decimal field that designates the power output,
number of channels and whether the phone is capable of VOX operation (voice
operated, or push to talk transmission.  Saves battery life on portables,
only relevant when the Cellular system supports this feature).  The most
common entries for this field are:

           BINARY  DECIMAL  # OF CHANNELS  POWER OUTPUT  VOX

           0000     00          666             3        NO
           0010     02          666            .6        NO
           0100     04          666             3        YES
           0110     06          666            .6        YES
    *      1000     08          832             3        NO
    **     1010     10          832            .6        NO
           1100     12          832             3        YES
           1110     14          832            .6        YES

*  Most common for all newer mobile phones.
** Most common for all newer portable phones.


SIDH     SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION (for) HOME SYSTEM

A five digit decimal number that is specified by the system operator.  The
last digit corresponds to the Preferred System mark 0 or 1 (see above).

COPYRIGHT 1993 CALIFORNIA GRAPEVINE COMMUNICATIONS

QUESTIONS?  TEL: (714) 643-8426  FAX: (714)643-8379

PART II.                      DEFINITIONS


The following is a list of commonly used abbreviations used in cellular
phones.

SIDH

A 15-bit field in the NAM designating the System Identification for the Home
System.  Bit 0 of the SIDH corresponds to the Preferred System flag used
elsewhere in the NAM.  Bits 6 and 5 of byte 0 are international code bits.
Normally the SIDH is entered during programming of the phone as a 5 digit
decimal number.  Enter 0's to the left-most unused positions when 
reprogramming.

L.U.

Local Use Flag.  Tells the cellular phone user if it must preregister with
the system.  Preregistration with the system means that a mobile must 
transmit its parameters to the Cellular System as soon as the power-up
task and the control channel tasks are completed. "1" enables the flag.
Usually set to "1".

MIN MARK

A 1-bit flag designating that MIN2 (area code) is always sent when making
system access.  "1" enables the flag.  Usually set to "1".

MIN2

A 10-bit field representing the area code of the mobile ID number.

MIN1

A 24-bit field representing the mobile telephone number.  MIN2 plus MIN1
equals MIN, the 10-digit phone number.

SCM

A 4-bit field designating the Station Class Mark. A (3-Watt) 832 channel
mobile unit typically will be 1000, a 1.2 Watt portable 1001 or a 0.6 Watt
handheld 1010 or 1110 (discontinuous transmission, meaning push-to-talk).
These are class I, Class II and Class III power levels respectively.
With the SCM the cellular system determines whether or not a cellular phone
can be switched to one of the 156 channels.
        Bit-1 is "0" for 666 and "1" for 832. (See cellular freq. list)
        Bit-2 is "0" for a mobile unit and "1" for a voice-activated 
          transmit.
        Bit-3 and -4 identify the power class of the phone: 
                "00" = 3.0 watts
                "01" = 1.2 watts
                "10" = 0.6 watts
                "11" is not assigned

IPCH

An 11-bit field designating the initial paging channel to be used if in
the home system.  Normally it is 334 for wireline systems, 333 for non-
wireline systems.  But most phones allow other settings for test purposes.

ACCOLC

A 4-bit field designating the overload class for the cellular phone.  The
intention of this entry is to allow the Cellular System to be able to 
determine priority in the event of a system overload, however it is currently
useless as the system operators have generally not provided guidance for
thier installers.  The usual (and correct) system now in effect (in U.S.) is
to use a "0" plus the last digit of the phone number.  Test phones should be
set at "10",emergency vehicles at "11","12" through "15" are reserved.
(A class 15 system is supposed to be police, fire, or military).
P.S.

1 1-bit flag designating the preferred system.  If PS is "0", channels 334
through 666(EVIL!!!) are used.  If PS is "1" then channels 1 through 333 are
used.  Even numbered system numbers (B systems) require a PS of "0", odd
system numbers (A systems) require a "1".

GIM

A 4-bit field designating the Group Identification Mark.  This number tells
the Cellular system how far to look in the SIDH to determine if it is roaming
in a system which may have a roam agreement with the phone system.  It is
usually set to "10".

LOCK DIGITS

A 4-bit field designating the unlock code.  The digit "0" in the lock code
is represented by an "A" in the actual NAM hexidecimal data.  A lock code of
all "0" sometimes unlocks the cellular phone.(Note: Lock codes are 3 digits.
When programming a phone use "0" as the first number.)

E.E.

A 1-bit flag designating that end-to-end signaling is enabled.  End-to-end
signaling means that the DTMF tones will be transmitted on the voice channel
as well as being echoed on the handset.  This feature in necessary for
such services as Bank by Phone, activating answering machines and in third
party long distance services such as Sprint and MCI. A "1" enables the flag.
Usually set to "1".

REP

A 1-bit flag designating that repertory memory (speed dialing) in the
cellular phone is enabled.  And once a again a "1" enables the flag.

H.A.

A 1-bit flag designating that the horn alert feature in enabled. "1" enables 
the flag.

H.F.

A 1-bit flag designating that the handsfree option is enabled. A "1" enables
the flag.  Often, transceivers supplied as hands-free units require that
this flag be left at "0".

*****************************************************************************


TUCoPS is optimized to look best in Firefox® on a widescreen monitor (1440x900 or better).
Site design & layout copyright © 1986-2014 AOH